HOMELAND SECURITY

Obama nominates Wagner as DHS intell chief

Caryn Wagner would head office that uses IT to share info with state, local officials

President Barack Obama today nominated Caryn Wagner to be the Homeland Security Department’s intelligence chief, a position that oversees information technology systems designed to share information with federal, state and local officials.

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If confirmed by the Senate, Wagner would direct DHS’ Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A). In that role, Wagner would lead DHS’ involvement in state and local intelligence fusion centers where officials from different levels of government use IT to coordinate homeland security efforts.

Obama’s previous pick for the role, Philip Mudd, withdrew his nomination before the Senate could vote on whether to confirm him. Meanwhile, Obama announced Wagner’s planned nomination Oct. 23.

DHS officials recently announced plans to better align I&A’s IT capabilities to the needs of the department’s analysts and its state, local, tribal and private sector partners. Officials also plan to establish a new office to coordinate DHS’ intelligence-sharing efforts in state and local intelligence fusion centers.

Wagner currently serves on the senior faculty at the Intelligence Security Academy, an organization that provides training and consulting services related to national security. Previously, she held a variety of senior government intelligence jobs, according to DHS.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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