AFCEA branches into federal energy initiatives

Move represents an expansion of association's traditional focus on military and defense technology

To support the technological aspects of meeting renewed federal energy efficiency mandates, the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) wil rebrand its Germantown, Md., chapter as the AFCEA Energy Chapter.

The move represents an expansion of the association’s traditional focus on military and defense technology. AFCEA Energy will offer a medium for collaboration between industry and government leaders in science, technology and policy, according to a recent news release.

Despite Germantown’s proximity to Washington, the chapter plans to establish a virtual environment through Web 2.0 strategies that it says will promote transparency and broader scope across various organizations with stakes in the national energy discussion.

“The Germantown chapter has always enjoyed a valuable relationship with the Department of Energy. Now, through collaborative technology, they can open their doors to serve all federal agencies with national security interests,” Curt Adams, AFCEA International's senior director for member and chapter services, said in the release.

About the Author

Amber Corrin is a former staff writer for FCW and Defense Systems.

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