Former EDS exec Duffey to be Virginia's next technology secretary

The president and chief executive of Duff Consulting has worked at EDS and Dell

Virginia Gov.-elect Bob McDonnell has nominated Jim Duffey to serve as his secretary of technology, according to announcement today from the Northern Virginia Technology Council.

Duffey, president and chief executive of Duff Consulting, spent 24 years at EDS Corp., where he held a variety of positions in the United States and Europe, including three years as vice president and public-sector general manager, responsible for all of EDS’ state and local, federal, civilian, military and Medicare client relationships.

He also is a former vice president and public-sector general manager at Dell.

Duffey has served on NVTC’s board of directors since 2004 and was vice chair from July 2006 to January 2009.

“Jim will bring a strong private-sector perspective to state government and enthusiastically champion the issues and initiatives that are so critical to our regional and statewide technology community,” said NVTC Chairwoman Donna Morea, president of U.S., Europe and Asia at CGI.

In November McDonnell, a Republican, named Bobbie Kilberg, NVTC president and chief executive officer, as one of five co-chairs for his transition team.

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