FIPS-certified USB drives have security flaws

The recently reported discovery of a vulnerability in supposedly secure USB flash drives has prompted a review of the certification process for cryptographic modules under the Federal Information Processing Standards. The flaw could potentially allow unauthorized access to encrypted data

At least three USB drive models subject to the vulnerability discovered by the German security firm SySS had received the FIPS 140-2 certification, a requirement for government encryption tools administered in this country by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Related story: South Korean military bans USB flash drives


“We are in the process of reviewing the information on this vulnerability,” NIST officials said in a statement issued Friday. “From our initial analysis, it appears that the software authorizing decryption, rather than the cryptographic module certified by NIST, is the source of this vulnerability. Nevertheless, we are actively investigating whether any changes in the NIST certification process should be made in light of this issue.”

Affected FIPS certified devices include the SanDisk Cruzer Enterprise FIPS Editions CZ32 and CZ46 in 1G, 2G, 4G and 8G; and the Verbatim Corporate Secure FIPS Edition in 1G, 2G, 4G and 8G. A number of other USB drive models from SanDisk, Verbatim and Kingston not certified under FIPS also are affected by the vulnerabilities.

All three companies have issued software updates to correct the problem.

The vulnerability was reported in December by SySS, where researchers also created a tool to exploit it. The drives use the AES encryption algorithm with a strong 256-bit key to encrypt data stored on the devices. The AES algorithm remains secure, but the problem lies in the application running on the host computer to validate the password used to authorize decryption of data. Researchers found that the program sends the same character string to the drive to authorize decryption when the proper password is used. By inserting a tool in the password entry program to ensure that it always sends that authorization string, regardless of the password entered, users can decrypt data without using the proper password.

To date, FIPS certificates for the affected USB drives have not been revoked.

The FIPS Cryptographic Module Validation Program is a joint effort of NIST and the Communications Security Establishment of Canada to ensure that cryptographic tools meet government standards for performance and security. The most recent cryptographic standard, FIPS 140-2, was released in 2001. Testing is done by independent labs accredited by NIST, and the FIPS validation is required in cases where encryption of data is required.

About the Author

William Jackson is a Maryland-based freelance writer.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.

Featured

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

  • Shutterstock image.

    Merged IT modernization bill punts on funding

    A House panel approved a new IT modernization bill that appears poised to pass, but key funding questions are left for appropriators.

  • General Frost

    Army wants cyber capability everywhere

    The Army's cyber director said cyber, electronic warfare and information operations must be integrated into warfighters' doctrine and training.

  • Rising Star 2013

    Meet the 2016 Rising Stars

    FCW honors 30 early-career leaders in federal IT.

Reader comments

Tue, Jan 12, 2010 RayW

http://news.techworld.com/storage/3209946/sandisk-verbatim-warn-of-usb-drive-security-flaw/ has a more complete writeup of the issue and there are several other sites with varying information. What it looks like is that the computer software sends the same stream to all the devices (of a given model). So how does modifying the PC software solve the problem? From what some 'analysts' are saying over the past few days, the drives are fine, but the access to the drives is a one key fits all (of any given model) system. Sounds like a rewrite time for the FIPS.

Mon, Jan 11, 2010 PD

CMVP means just that -- module validation, and you can't rely on module validation as some kind of imprimatur on an entire solution. If you want software or functionality assurance you need to be looking at Common Criteria evaluations, not just CMVP results in a vaccuum. This debacle is the inevitable result of firms taking clearly-defined security evaluation terms into the blurry consumer/retail space, and over-selling their offerings.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group