NRC looks for public input on open government

Nuclear Regulatory Commission plans to follow directive even though independent agencies are exempt

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is asking for comments from the public on how the agency should conform with the White House’s Open Government Directive, according to a notice posted in today’s Federal Register.

Even though the directive does not apply to independent agencies such as NRC, the commission plans to comply with the directive, according to the posting.

“The NRC is requesting public comment to aid the NRC's determination of what datasets it might be appropriate to publish online and what transparency, public participation and collaboration improvements it might include as it drafts its Open Government Plan,” the notice states.

According to the directive, agencies must publish at least three high-value datasets by Jan. 22 and an open-government plan by April 7. NRC officials plan to meet both deadlines, according to the notice. The agency also plans to create an open government Web site, another requirement under the directive.

Comments can be made via the federal rulemaking Web site, Regulations.gov. Search for documents filed under docket identification NRC-2010-0003 to find the appropriate page for leaving comments.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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