FCC launches discussion on the news media

Commission examining TV, newspapers, radio in the digital age

The Federal Communications Commission wants to stimulate public discussion on the future of the American news media that may form the basis for public policies, the commission announced today.

The FCC issued a public notice today that created a formal comment process on questions the commission will consider as it prepares a report on the future of media in the digital age later this year.

The FCC wants opinions on the information needs of communities, and business models and financial trends for news produced for television, newspapers, radio, the Internet and other media outlets.

The public can participate through the commission's official comment filing systems as well as a new Web site, FCC.gov/FutureofMedia. 

All comments on the site also will be considered part of the official public record.

“We are at a critical juncture in the evolution of American media,” FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said in a statement. “Rapid technological change in the media marketplace has created opportunities for tremendous innovation. It has also caused financial turmoil for traditional media, calling into question whether these media outlets will continue to play their historic role in providing local communities with essential news and civic information.”

The FCC recently launched several programs to increase public participation in its activities, including the Reboot Web site.

 

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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