NASA plans Tweetup event for Space Shuttle mission

Selected Twitter followers will get a tour of Johnson Space Center

A small group of followers of NASA's Twitter feeds will participate in a Tweetup event at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, where they will get a behind-the-scenes look at a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station, according to the space agency.


Related stories

NASA projects could speed transmissions from the final frontier

Green tech: NASA brings space tech down to earth


The Tweetup will take place on Feb. 17 during space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour is targeted to launch on Feb. 7.

NASA will randomly select 100 persons on Twitter from a pool of registrants who sign up on the Web, the agency said. Another 50 registrants will be added to a waiting list. Registration for the event ends today.

During the event, NASA Twitter followers will tour the center and view Mission Control and astronauts' training facilities. Participants also will speak with flight directors, trainers, astronauts and managers.

The Tweetup will include a meet and greet session to allow participants to mingle with fellow Tweeps and the staff behind the tweets on @NASA.

"This is the home of all of the astronauts and the historic Mission Control Center,” said NASA astronaut Mike Massimino, who also is known as @astro_Mike. “It's an outstanding location to provide our Twitter community with an insider's view of human spaceflight. I'll be on one of the two mission control teams working at that time to keep Endeavour and space station operating safely.”

 

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.