Budget would double money for Justice IT fund

Administration wants $179.79 million in fiscal 2011 to fund departmentwide IT investments at Justice

The Obama administration wants to double the funding for the Justice Department’s information technology centralized investments in fiscal 2011 compared with fiscal 2010.


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The Justice Information Sharing Technology account that funds departmentwide spending on IT would get $179.79 million in fiscal 2011 under the administration’s budget proposal. That account controlled by Justice’s chief information officer got $88.29 million this fiscal year.

According to the budget proposal, Justice's current major programs funded by the account include:

  • Joint Automated Booking System (JABS) to provide data to FBI’s fingerprint identification system through an automated process.
  • Justice Consolidated Office Network (JCON) Office Automation to give a reliable office automation platform that includes standard architecture for parts of the Justice Department.
  • Litigation Case Management System (LCMS) to develop a common framework for the processes and systems that support litigation case management.
  • JCON Secret/Top Secret program to provide a departmentwide IT infrastructure for electronically sharing, processing and storing classified information.
  • Law Enforcement Information Sharing Program to put in place IT tools to share information across the law enforcement community.
  • Unified Financial Management System (UFMS) to allow Justice to standardize business practices and procedures across all components.
  • Cybersecurity program to protect the department's IT systems.

The proposal would give $90.63 million in program enhancements for JABS, JCON, LCMS, JCON Secret/Top Secret, and UFMS.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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