Food-safety, public health surveillance IT highlight FDA fiscal 2011 budget request

FDA is asking for a 23 percent increase in its budget to focus on food safety, science and public health initiatives

The Food and Drug Administration wants a 23 percent increase in its budget for fiscal 2011, in part to expand several information technology programs for food safety and public-health surveillance and monitoring.

Highlights in the budget are transformation of food safety practices, improved medical product safety, expanded patient safety initiatives and modernization of the FDA’s regulatory science, including nanotechnology.

Overall, the FDA is seeking $4 billion in fiscal 2011 to promote public health and safety, a $750 million increase from the current $3.3 billion.


More on this topic:

FDA Fiscal 2011 Budget Justification of Estimates for Appropriations Committee


New food safety initiatives would add $318 million, including new track-and-trace technology, improved data collection and risk analysis, according to the FDA’s budget justification submitted to Congress.

The FDA would spend $10 million in enterprise IT and for IT systems to establish, support, and maintain the systems necessary to collect Food Registration and Inspection User Fees.

The FDA also wants to spend $89 million to strengthen its processes for reviewing drug safety, including IT that supports human drug reviews.

Additional funding would be dedicated to the FDA’s IT infrastructure to enable interoperability of regulatory data sharing across the agency's program areas. The enterprisewide FDA IT systems include the Regulated Product Submission framework, the Janus program for a common data architecture, the Common Electronic Document Room and MedWatch Plus.

The FDA’s Sentinel Initiative would receive an additional $5 million, or nine full-time-equivalent positions. It is an effort to improve surveillance of postmarket product safety.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    NDAA process is now loaded with Solarium cyber amendments

    Much of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission's agenda is being pushed into this year's defense authorization process, including its crown jewel idea of a national cyber director.

  • Defense
    DOD photo by Senior Airman Perry Aston  11th Wing Public Affairs

    How DOD's executive exodus could affect tech modernization

    Back-to-back resignations raise concerns about how things will be run without permanent leadership in key areas from policy to tech development.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.