GSA administrator Johnson to speak at FOSE

Johnson, GSA's new administrator, will speak at 11 a.m. March 25 at the Washington Convention Center.

Martha Johnson, the new administrator of the General Services Administration, will speak at 11 a.m. March 25 at the FOSE 2010 conference.

The conference, hosted by 1105 Government Information Group, runs from March 23 through March 25 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.


Related stories:

GSA administrator promises innovative solutions, superior performance from her agency

GSA's Martha Johnson, in her own words


Johnson was confirmed by the Senate Feb. 5 and sworn in Feb. 16.

In a speech during her swearing-in ceremony, Johnson said GSA must know its clients, meet their needs through innovation and do it well. To that end, she named Tony Costa, former deputy commissioner for GSA's Public Buildings Service, to be associate administrator, a new position in which he will find ways GSA can offer its complete package of services to better serve its clients.

FOSE is an annual conference and exhibition for government information technology professionals.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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