GSA promotes veteran leader to acting deputy CAO

Lantier has worked at GSA for 33 years, working in its Public Buildings Service and for 14 years in the acquisition policy office.

Rodney Lantier is now acting deputy chief acquisition officer at the General Services Administration after the retirement of deputy CAO David Drabkin, an agency official said March 5.

Lantier will be acting deputy while GSA searches for a permanent deputy CAO, said Michael Robertson, GSA's CAO and associate administrator for governmentwide policy.


Relates Stories:

GSA's Drabkin heads to Northrop Grumman

Robertson is Obama's inside man at GSA


Drabkin retired last week and will be director of acquisition policy at Northrop Grumman.

Lantier has been at GSA for 33 years, working at the agency's Public Buildings Service. He also has 14 years of experience at the acquisition policy office. During the past two years, Lantier has been chief of staff at the policy office and, most recently, was assistant deputy associate administrator for acquisition.

For three years, Lantier was program manager of the Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation program. Among his other jobs, he has worked on developing GSA regulations, especially for the Federal Acquisition Regulation.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.