Most visitors to GSA's Apps.gov are window shoppers

Site to be revamped to make content more accessible, encourage buyers

Federal agencies are using Apps.gov primarily for comparison shopping of cloud computer applications offered for sale rather than buying, a senior General Services Administration official said today at the FOSE trade show.

GSA debuted Apps.gov in the fall of 2009 as a platform to offer cloud computing applications for sale. “When we started out, I was not expecting it to be a research tool, but more of a procurement tool,” Katie Lewin, chief of staff at the Office of the Chief Information Officer at GSA, said at a forum on cloud computing.

“People are not really buying on Apps.gov. They are using it to check prices,” Lewin said. After checking the prices, the prospective buyers presumably are using that information to help structure their own cloud computing buys, she added.

While she is “somewhat disappointed” that more purchases are not being made on the Apps.gov site, Lewin said it was gratifying that tens of thousands of people have visited Apps.gov.

To attract more users, the site is being revamped to improve its design and make content more readily accessed.

Also in that session, Mike Anastasio, director of the GSA’s strategic solutions contracts division, said GSA has issued a special notice for its “Infrastructure as a Service” acquisition under Supply Schedule 70. The special notice was published on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site on March 22.

The procurement covers cloud computing, Web hosting, virtual machines and storage. GSA withdrew a previous notice so it could be revised and the security level heightened to “moderate,” from “low,” Anastasio said.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.