Bill would vaccinate Tricare against reform complications

Proposed bill would address the concerns of military families

A proposed Senate bill, the Tricare Affirmation Act, would change the IRS tax code to state that those covered under Tricare and other Defense Department health plans meet the minimum essential individual health insurance coverage requirement that is part of the health care reform bill that President Obama signed into law March 23. The bill was introduced March 22 by Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va)

Webb said the bill was necessary to clear up any potential confusion over whether enrollees in Tricare and related plans meet the new act’s minimum coverage requirements. Beneficiaries of Tricare for Life and military veterans’ health care programs also satisfy requirements under the Webb measure. A companion bill in the House, H.R.4887, introduced by House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton (D-Mo), was approved by the House on March 20 by a vote of 403 to 0.

“This bill sets the record straight,” Webb said. “Supporting this bill will reassure our servicemembers that the coverage provided by Tricare will exceed the minimal essential coverage required under the health care reform bill.”

About the Author

Federal Daily, an 1105 Government Information Group site, features news and resources for federal and postal employees.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.