NIH contract in GSA's crosshairs brings in $2.1 billion a year

Agency maneuvers could bring new business to GSA

If the General Services Administration were successful in convincing the Office of Federal Procurement Policy that the National Institutes of Health should lose its governmentwide contract authority, GSA potentially could pick up $1 billion in new business, if not more.

A look at procurement data provided by market research firm Input shows that agencies spent $2.1 billion through the NIH Chief Information Officer Solutions and Partners (CIOSP) contract during fiscal 2009.


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Of that total, 56 percent, or $1.2 billion, was spent by NIH and other Health and Human Services Department agencies.

Assuming that business stays with an HHS contract – and that’s a big assumption – GSA has the potential to grab $900 million more in contracting business. The total could be much greater if GSA picks up some of the HHS business.

After HHS, other big spenders on the contract:

  • Homeland Security, which had 13 percent of the task orders, worth $269.5 million.
  • Army, with 10 percent of the task orders, worth $217.5 million.
  • Justice had 7 percent, or $161 million.
  • Interior, EPA and Agriculture had 2 percent.

Even GSA was a fan of CIOSP, sending $20.7 million in task orders through it during fiscal 2009, according to Input.

On the contractor side, Lockheed Martin was by far the most active, winning 37 percent of the task orders that total $793.7 million. SRA International was the next highest during fiscal 2009 with 14 percent of the task orders, worth a total of $305.6 million.

About the Author

Nick Wakeman is the editor-in-chief of Washington Technology. Follow him on Twitter: @nick_wakeman.

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