The CIOs' growing workload

1996: The Clinger-Cohen Act creates the chief information officer position at all federal departments and major agencies and gives the position responsibility for developing strategic plans for information technology resources and staffing, assisting with capital planning and budgets, and creating enterprise architecture plans for submission to the Office of Management and Budget.

1998: The Government Paperwork Elimination Act requires agencies to offer people the option of submitting information or conducting transactions electronically and mandates that agencies maintain records electronically, when practicable.

2001: OMB requires agencies to submit business cases for proposed IT systems and document that they are following proper project management practices.


In this report

The CIO 14 years later: Power vs. paperwork

So you want to be a CIO?


2002:

The E-Government Act requires that federal CIOs participate in the CIO Council, produce quarterly status reports on their agencies' e-government progress and evaluate the privacy impact of applicable IT systems on an annual basis.

2002: The Federal Information Security Management Act mandates extensive reporting on security issues.

2004: Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 requires agencies to create computerized identification systems for employees and contractors.

2005: OMB requires agencies to use earned value management to manage projects and keep OMB apprised of the status of IT projects.

2007: OMB requires agencies to adopt standardized security configurations for all desktop computers that run certain Microsoft Windows operating systems.

2010: OMB requires agencies to inventory all data center assets by April 30, develop consolidation plans by Aug. 30 to incorporate into fiscal 2012 budgets, and submit quarterly updates on their inventory and consolidation efforts.

About the Author

John Zyskowski is a senior editor of Federal Computer Week. Follow him on Twitter: @ZyskowskiWriter.

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