White House contributes to open-source project

Four modules add custom code to Drupal

The White House has released some of the open source code for Whitehouse.gov, according to a posting on the site.

"This code is available for anyone to review, use, or modify," wrote White House blogger Dave Cole. "We're excited to see how developers across the world put our work to good use in their own applications."

Much of the site is already open source as part of the Drupal project, he added. The White House adopted the open-source Drupal content management system for the Web site last year. Today's release adds custom code to Drupal, making the White House a participant in open-source development.

The release adds four modules to enhance three key characteristics: scalability, communication and accessibility.

For scalability, Whitehouse.gov is releasing a module named ContextHTTPHeaders, which allows site builders to add metadata to Web pages that can control them page by page. For example, a site developer can easily create instructions that lead to browsers caching certain types of pages for a longer period of time than others.

Another scalability-related module, called Akami, enables the Web site to integrate with the content-delivery network of that same name.   

The GovDelivery module allows site developers to tailor e-mail messages to the preferences of recipients.

On the accessibility front, a module named NodeEmbed allows developers to manage photo and video content to ensure it complies with accessibility rules, Cole wrote.

About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.

Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    human machine interface

    Your agency isn’t ready for AI

    To truly take advantage, government must retool both its data and its infrastructure.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network (bluebay/Shutterstock.com)

    Federal CISO floats potential for new supply chain regs

    The federal government's top IT security chief and canvassed industry for feedback on how to shape new rules of the road for federal acquisition and procurement.

  • People
    DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, shown here at her Nov. 8, 2017, confirmation hearing. DHS Photo by Jetta Disco

    DHS chief Nielsen resigns

    Kirstjen Nielsen, the first Homeland Security secretary with a background in cybersecurity, is being replaced on an acting basis by the Customs and Border Protection chief. Her last day is April 10.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.