CYBEREYE

J.K. Rowling, eat your heart out: NIST updates a bestseller

'The Handbook of Mathematical Functions' is updated and digital – yes!

The National Institute of Standards and Technology is known for producing some gripping prose. Who can forget the riveting Guide for Assessing the Security Controls in Federal Information Systems and Organizations”? But the agency has rarely produced anything as popular as its "Handbook of Mathematical Functions," a million-seller that ranks as the agency’s most widely cited publication of all time.

After a decade of preparation, NIST has released the updated handbook, accompanied by its companion online version, the "Digital Library of Mathematical Functions."

The handbook made its first appearance in 1964, the year the Beatles came to America. It remains the most widely distributed NIST publication and still receives more than 1,600 citations a year in research literature. DLMF is intended to be the definitive reference work on special functions of applied mathematics. The handbook received seed funding from the National Science Foundation and was compiled and edited at NIST from the contributions of more than 50 subject-area experts.

The DLMF is available at dlmf.nist.gov. Its 967-page printed companion, the NIST "Handbook of Mathematical Functions," is published by Cambridge University Press, available for $99.

About the Author

William Jackson is a Maryland-based freelance writer.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.