TSA now handling watch list checks for all domestic flights

DHS says Secure Flight program being used for all flights inside of United States

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has finished taking over from airlines the responsibility of screening all passengers that are flying inside the United States against the government’s terrorist watch lists, as part of a multi-phase information technology program named Secure Flight.

Under the program, airlines must gather a passenger's full name, date of birth and gender when fliers make an flight reservation. TSA then uses that information to help determine if the passenger matches an entry on the no-fly or selectee watch lists.

By the end of this year the government expects all international carriers with direct flight to the United States to also begin using Secure Flight.

In a statement released June 7, the Homeland Security Department, TSA’s parent agency, billed the agency’s take over of watch list screening for U.S. domestic flights as a “major aviation security milestone.”

In the absence of Secure Flight, airlines have been responsible for checking passengers against watch lists. DHS says that Secure Flight improves security and helps prevent the misidentification of passengers with names similar to those in the government’s name-based terrorist watch lists.


Related stories

Secure Flight cited as fix for lag in 'no-fly list' update

TSA launches Secure Flight for passengers


Officials have faced increased pressure to get Secure Flight in place after an unsuccessful car bombing attempt in New York City’s Times Square last month.

Faisal Shahzad, who allegedly attempted to set off the bomb, was reportedly added to the no-fly list after that incident. However, Shahzad was allowed to board an aircraft before authorities arrested him because the airline involved apparently didn’t check Shahzad against an update to the list when he purchased a ticket at the last minute. Since that incident, TSA has required airlines to check for updates to the no-fly list more frequently.

“We will not have this problem anymore” when Secure Flight is fully in place, Caryn Wagner, DHS’ undersecretary for intelligence and analysis, told a House panel last month.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Mon, Jul 5, 2010 United States

How do you get OFF of the watch list? Apparently my husband is on the list and we encountered seating delays over the past weekend

Fri, Jul 2, 2010

no need for name or information, everytime you log in, the government has its bird dogs watch everything you do..such an oppresive nation in USA now..i am ashamed of USA..i served my country for 6 years in the US ARMY, when it really was the right thing to do..now look at what the government does to us all..the government walks on us with no care or consideration now..shame on Washington D.C.............

Tue, Jun 15, 2010 AJ Pensacola

Unfortunately the airlines have not modified their online airline reservation screens to obtain the flier's date of birth and gender. Neither have the travel companies such as Travelocity. I suspect their databases have not been modified to store this date yet either.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group