GSA names 'chief greening officer' for buildings

New position oversees more than 9,000 structures

The General Services Administration has named Eleni Reed to the newly created post of chief greening officer, in charge of reducing the environmental impact of more than 9,000 federal buildings.

Reed will oversee sustainability efforts at the GSA regarding its 1,500 agency-owned and 8,100 leased buildings, according to a news release. The new position was created in response to President Barack Obama’s executive order on sustainability issued in October 2009.

Sustainability for green buildings involves enhancing energy efficiency, reducing water usage and waste and reducing carbon dioxide emissions at facilities.

“Eleni Reed’s role as Chief Greening Officer is central to building a sustainable, better performing portfolio as GSA strives to meet its commitment of achieving a zero environmental footprint,” said Robert Peck, GSA's commissioner of public buildings.

Previously, Reed was director of sustainability strategies with the Cushman & Wakefield Client Solutions Group. There she helped develop an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency for the environmental management of the firm’s properties.

Reed also worked with the New York City Office of Operations and led the implementation of the city’s Green Building Standards law.

 

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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