Most transitioned NSPS workers got pay hike. How about you?

71 percent of employees moved to the General Schedule pay system saw an average salary increase of $1,363 per year

A large majority of civilian Defense Department employees who have been moved out of the National Security Personnel System (NSPS) so far have received a pay hike when they transitioned to the General Schedule (GS) pay system, according to the leader of transition process.

John James, director of the Defense Department's NSPS transition office, said that of the 53,057 employees who have been transitioned through the pay period that began on May 23,  approximately 71 percent received a pay increase, with an average hike of $1,363 per year. About 8 percent remained at their same rate of pay because their salary matched a step within their new GS grade,” James told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee's Federal Workforce Subcommittee.

James said that the remaining 21 percent earn salaries that exceed the maximum rate for their position’s GS grade and were subject to some form of pay retention, which usually limits their pay raises to one-half of the annual pay hikes until their GS grade catches up to their salary.


Related stories:

Pay caps may be in store for thousands of former NSPS workers

Survey reveals discontent with pay-for-performance plans

Pay for performance: A modester proposal

Pay for performance haunted by NSPS failure

Research questions link between pay and performance

4 approaches to pay for performance


The pay retention group “is concentrated at the GS-12 and above levels, where many NSPS employees were advantaged by pay rate ranges that exceeded the rates for GS equivalent jobs,” James said. “Recognizing the potential salary implications to the employee, components are taking steps to mitigate the impact of pay retention.”

Patricia Niehaus, president of the Federal Managers Association, testified that the pay retention rules were unfair and that DOD should be encouraging transition officers to use existing authorities to make sure employee future pay hikes are not affected. If the final proportion of employees hit with pay retention is about 16 percent, it will mean that about 36,000 transitioned employees will see their future raises cut in half.

“The irony in this is that if you were an under-performer, returning to the General Schedule will actually lead to an increase in pay,” Niehaus said. “Employees who fall beneath Step 1 pay-wise will automatically move up to Step 1.”

 

Featured

  • Telecommunications
    Stock photo ID: 658810513 By asharkyu

    GSA extends EIS deadline to 2023

    Agencies are getting up to three more years on existing telecom contracts before having to shift to the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions vehicle.

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image ID: 569172169 By Zenzen

    OMB looks to retrain feds to fill cyber needs

    The federal government is taking steps to fill high-demand, skills-gap positions in tech by retraining employees already working within agencies without a cyber or IT background.

  • Acquisition
    GSA Headquarters (Photo by Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

    GSA to consolidate multiple award schedules

    The General Services Administration plans to consolidate dozens of its buying schedules across product areas including IT and services to reduce duplication.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.