Security-cleared job seekers have new social network

ClearanceJobs.com launches new recruiting and networking site

Editor's note: This story has been modified since its original publication to correct a link and clarify some information.

Agencies and contractors often find themelves in need of job candidates with security clearances, but matching up needs and suitable applicants can be difficult. And some security clearances bar their holders from posting public profiles at all on social-networking sites such as Facebook.

ClearanceJobs.com, an online resource for employees with active federal security clearances, today unveiled The Cleared Network. It's a private online community that combines a specialized job board with the other benefits of social networking. The Cleared Network is accessible only to registered members with clearances, but a video demonstrating the site's features is available here.


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The company said the network gives employers and security-cleared employees a place to learn more about each other through using pictures, videos and short, informative profiles.

The network will help with recruiting employees and companies can highlight events or jobs they might have available, according to the announcement at ClearanceJobs.com.

The Cleared Network requires that a participant to be "a U.S. citizen with an active or current security clearance issued by the federal government — no exceptions."

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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Reader comments

Tue, Jul 6, 2010

I always wonder about those types of sites - who's the site owner and what are their affiliations? Anyone can put up a site like this and make it look legit.

Wed, Jun 30, 2010 Jennifer

This new 'feature' does not really validate if someone has a clearance or not. It just asks the candidate if they have a clearance. It does not appear to actually 'validate' as it doesn't appear to sync with any security clearance databases to verify the candidates claim to a 'current' current clearance...all candidates will still need to be verified the same old way-through a security officer of some sort. Otherwise, you are just putting more 'personal information' (or PID) out there for the taking...how wise is that?

Wed, Jun 30, 2010 Eddie

Brad, closed network to me is one with no access to the web - I define that as closed. Anything with access to the web, I call it "unsafe network". Having a username and password does not define closed network. At least Niels is thinking security (the right way). I would exercise caution before putting too much information out there, in the end, some of us have contractual reponsibilities to our employers which may include not posting anythinmg at all about your current job. So beware if you signed an agreement with your employer or government to get approval prior to posting info on the web (closed netowrk or not.

Tue, Jun 29, 2010 Brad

Niels - only online banks have multifactor authentication. You expect a career site to have it? Maybe they should add biometrics too? Anyone with a credit card can grab resumes from Monster. At least Clearancejobs is a closed network.

Mon, Jun 28, 2010

Sounds like a tempting target for hackers, and an IQ test for folks with clearances (i.e., you fail the test if you join).

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