Security-cleared job seekers have new social network

ClearanceJobs.com launches new recruiting and networking site

Editor's note: This story has been modified since its original publication to correct a link and clarify some information.

Agencies and contractors often find themelves in need of job candidates with security clearances, but matching up needs and suitable applicants can be difficult. And some security clearances bar their holders from posting public profiles at all on social-networking sites such as Facebook.

ClearanceJobs.com, an online resource for employees with active federal security clearances, today unveiled The Cleared Network. It's a private online community that combines a specialized job board with the other benefits of social networking. The Cleared Network is accessible only to registered members with clearances, but a video demonstrating the site's features is available here.


Related stories:

Social networking: Agency silos 2.0?

5 tips for achieving social network awesomeness


The company said the network gives employers and security-cleared employees a place to learn more about each other through using pictures, videos and short, informative profiles.

The network will help with recruiting employees and companies can highlight events or jobs they might have available, according to the announcement at ClearanceJobs.com.

The Cleared Network requires that a participant to be "a U.S. citizen with an active or current security clearance issued by the federal government — no exceptions."

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    OPM nominee plans focus on telework, IT, retirement

    Kiran Ahuja, a veteran of the Office of Personnel Management, told lawmakers that she thinks that the lack of consistent leadership in the top position at OPM has taken a toll on the ability of the agency to complete longer term IT modernization projects.

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

Stay Connected