First lady wants help to create childhood obesity infographics

Public invited to submit their ideas until July 6

Michelle Obama’s campaign to reduce childhood obesity in a generation is looking for the best information graphic to convey the severity of the problem, as well as  possible solutions to it.

The first lady’s “Let’s Move!” campaign is working with the Good collaboration Web site to seek infographic submissions by July 6, according to a news release posted on the White House blog.

The LetsMove.gov task force released an action plan for reducing the epidemic of overweight children last month;  now it's looking for a colorful, powerful graphic to present childhood obesity information with the greatest effect.


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“The idea is to create an infographic that shows the current state of children’s health, and that illustrates some avenue to combat the epidemic, including: Getting children a healthy start on life; empowering parents and caregivers; providing healthy food in schools; improving access to healthy, affordable food; and getting children more physically active,” according to the news release.

The inforgraphic should be in a .JPEG format with a resolution sufficient enough to be printed at 300 dots per inch. Awards will be given for best use of information, best aesthetics and best overall infographic. The winners will be announced June 20 and featured at Letsmove.gov and the White House blog.

 

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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