The dirty dozen: 12 bad government Web sites

A gallery of government portals that deliver a bad user experience

The White House’s Open Government Directive, issued in December 2009, mandated that federal departments and agencies develop and implement open government plans to advance transparency of their data and encourage participation and collaboration. Since then, agencies have been rolling out everything from new wikis to redesigned Web sites to IT dashboards to comply with the directive and make government data more accessible.

But not all open government Web sites are created equal; some, in fact, deliver a downright awful user experience, according to Information Week's list of the 12 worst government Web sites.

The IW dirty dozen Web portals belong to:

Army Special Operations Command

National Transportation Safety Board

U.S. Court Of Appeals D.C. Circuit

City of Los Angeles 

U.S. Transportation Command 

House  Small Business Committee

The nation of Cambodia

The state of Illinois

Justice Department's Executive Office for Immigration Review

Navy Personnel Command

The Federal Register

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Services

To view Information Week's slide show of the 12 worst government Web sites, click here.

This article was corrected July 7, 2010.

 

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