Most feds happy with their jobs, survey says


Federal workers continue to be generally happy with their jobs and feel their work is important, according to the latest Office of Personnel Management survey of federal workplace satisfaction released July 12.

OPM conducts the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey—formerly known as the Federal Human Capital Survey—every other year. The 2010 results were drawn from the responses of about 250,000 workers who received copies of the survey in February and March.

“There is much good news to report,” said John Berry, OPM director. “[Feds] are proud to work for the government and feel an increased sense of personal accomplishment. The vast majority believe their agency is accomplishing its missions and would recommend it as a good place to work.”

A large majority of respondents in the 2010 survey said they felt the work that they did was important, (92.2 percent in 2010, compared to 91 percent in 2008); about eight in 10 indicated they like the work they do (85.6 percent in 2010 vs. 83.8 percent in 2008), and more than two-thirds said their performance appraisal was a fair reflection of what they did, (68.4 percent in 2010, vs. 64.6 percent in 2008).

Overall, about two-thirds of respondents—65.8 percent—said they are satisfied with their pay, up significantly from 60.4 percent in 2008. While job satisfaction was generally similar across racial groups, pay satisfaction varied a more widely by race. White respondents reported the most satisfaction (68.9 percent). Pay satisfaction was far less among African-Americans (59.5 percent) and Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (53.6 percent).

To see more, and to access the report, go to: www.fedview.opm.gov/2010/

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