DARPA seeks young blood

Computer scientists invited to submit proposals to join research team

Editor's Note: This article has been modifed to correct the deadline date. 

You know those ads that ask you if you're bored with your job, want to explore new horizons, AND take on fresh challenges?

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency should consider running one. Instead, the research organization has published a FedBizOpps listing seeking computer science researchers interested in developing projects for the military. DARPA is soliciting proposals -- due by Oct. 15 -- for people to earn a one-year appointment to its Computer Science Study Group. The solicitation also offers optional extensions after the first year for some of the group members.

The goal of the program is to "identify and develop innovative ideas with high payoff in computer science and related disciplines," according to the solicitation.

The program is intentionally limited to junior faculty members at colleges at universities who have held their graduate degrees for no more than seven years and do not have tenure. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens able to earn a secret-level security clearance.

Jonathan Katz, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Maryland, was part of the most recent CSSG. In recommending others apply for the positions this time, he wrote: "Although one might not expect it (I didn’t), the CSSG is fairly 'theory friendly.' I was selected for the CSSG this past year, and Rocco Servedio [an associate computer science professor at Columbia University] was chosen two years ago. Moreover, explicitly listed as 'technologies of interest' are complexity theory(!), approximation algorithms, machine learning, and network modeling. (They also accept proposals that are not in the areas of interest.)" 

Jim Donlon is the CSSG program manager, replacing Ben Mann who left several months ago, said Mark Peterson, with DARPA public affairs.

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

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Reader comments

Tue, Aug 3, 2010

gee wiz, DARPA is finally focusing on its core mission -- research. How did it get distracted and diverted since 2001? Maybe it's because of who gets selected as the director?

Mon, Jul 19, 2010

Un-American? This sounds like a great program that is targeted for only certain people. Why is this Un-American? This agency is clearly looking for a certain type of person and there is nothing wrong with that. What's Un-American is your grammar, and lack of understanding for an Agency's desire to target a certain audience.

Mon, Jul 19, 2010

Oddly enough, organizations also care about written communication skills.

Mon, Jul 19, 2010 ss DC area

Hate organizations that hire only certain age people--how discriminatory, anti-deversity and seemingly un-America!

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