Watchdog group charts open government winners and losers

Where does your agency fall?

Five federal agencies have made dramatic improvements in their open government plans since April, according to a new independent audit released today of 39 agency transparency plans.

Under the president’s Open Government Directive issued in December 2009, 39 federal agencies were required to file Open Government Plans by April 2010 outlining how they would carry out the objectives of the directive. After receiving feedback on their plans, 23 of those agencies submitted updated plans, according to the OpenTheGovernment.org watchdog coalition.

The Education, Justice, and Health and Human Services departments, as well as the General Services and Social Security administrations, all moved up in ratings to be included among the 10 highest-scoring agencies, according to the watchdog group’s evaluation.


Related stories:

Open government plans updated, criticized

GSA tests crowdsourcing wiki for acquisitions


Justice rose from 38th place to eighth, while HHS moved from 24th place into second place; SSA jumped from 22nd place to sixth; GSA rose from 19th place to ninth; and Education went from 11th place to fifth.

“Clearly the race to the top is on. Agencies have improved their plans by responding to feedback from the administration, and from the public and committing resources toward this initiative. We look forward to continuing to build on this momentum as we look at implementation of open government,” Patrice McDermott, director of OpenTheGovernment.org, said in a news release.

The watchdog group’s audit examined whether the plans met the standards spelled out in the directive, and awarded bonus points for exceeding the requirements.

Also among the 10 top-scoring agencies were Corporation for National and Community Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Agriculture and Transportation departments.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • Social network, census

    5 predictions for federal IT in 2017

    As the Trump team takes control, here's what the tech community can expect.

  • Rep. Gerald Connolly

    Connolly warns on workforce changes

    The ranking member of the House Oversight Committee's Government Operations panel warns that Congress will look to legislate changes to the federal workforce.

  • President Donald J. Trump delivers his inaugural address

    How will Trump lead on tech?

    The businessman turned reality star turned U.S. president clearly has mastered Twitter, but what will his administration mean for broader technology issues?

  • Login.gov moving ahead

    The bid to establish a single login for accessing government services is moving again on the last full day of the Obama presidency.

  • Shutterstock image (by Jirsak): customer care, relationship management, and leadership concept.

    Obama wraps up security clearance reforms

    In a last-minute executive order, President Obama institutes structural reforms to the security clearance process designed to create a more unified system across government agencies.

  • Shutterstock image: breached lock.

    What cyber can learn from counterterrorism

    The U.S. has to look at its experience in developing post-9/11 counterterrorism policies to inform efforts to formalize cybersecurity policies, says a senior official.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group