Widget provides one-click access to travel tips

TSA, Customs and Border Protection find an easy way to make traveling easier

The Summer Travel Widget

Location: www.tsa.gov/travelers/share_widget.shtm

Agencies: Transportation Security Administration, Customs and Border Protection

Technology: JavaScript, HTML

The Transportation Security Administration developed the Summer Travel Web widget in conjunction with the Customs and Border Protection agency to provide travelers with easy access to helpful travel tips.

TSA and CBP also provided the widget to their travel industry partners to let them post it on their Web sites.

Web widgets are basically chunks of code that someone can install on an HTML-based Web page without needing to compile content.


Related stories:

A renaissance of government Web apps

10 gov apps that get results

Great dot-gov Web sites 2009

Great dot-gov Web sites 2008


The widget is designed for partners to easily display information without worrying about security issues, said Martin Erb, a Web analyst at TSA. The widget resides on the upper right-hand corner of the TSA.gov home page and has two icons, one for U.S. travel tips and one for international travel tips.

Clicking on the U.S. travel tips icon leads visitors to a TSA page that features a slide show presentation that displays the steps people should take to ensure smooth passage through security checkpoints. It also lists approved and prohibited items. Clicking on the international travelers tips directs visitors to CBP’s travel page.

TSA used a widget during the Secure Flight campaign, an effort that the agency launched to enhance security by improving watch list matching, a TSA spokesperson said. Widgets can be added or dropped as new programs start or end, and they do not take up a lot of space, although the Secure Flight widget was prominently displayed on the TSA.gov site, the spokesperson said.

TSA Widget

About the Author

Rutrell Yasin is is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.