Grassley questions NSF's efforts to keep employees off adult Web sites

Whistleblower claims employees are accessing inapprorpriate sites with impunity

Employees at the National Science Foundation have allegedly found their way around filters that block pornographic Web sites and continue to check out the sites, according to a report today from Politico.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) sent a letter to NSF officials this week after a whistleblower told his office the agency has not punished employees caught accessing porn on their work computers, according to the report.


Related story:

Porn provision stalls House IT bill


As it stands, the allegations are unconfirmed, but this letter emphasizes the concerns that Grassley and other federal officials have about employees' browsing habits at work, POLITICO reports.

Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), chairwoman of the appropriations subcommittee that oversees the agency’s budget, said the fiscal 2011 spending bill requires NSF officials to deal with pornography among workers or risk losing money for NSF's computer network, according to the report.

A NSF official told Politico that the agency has had no incidents of pornography viewing at work since it added filters.

 

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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