Allison Scogin: Sculpturing trusted data networks for warfighters

Name: Allison Scogin (pronounced Skah-gin)

Age: 28

Organization: Defense Information Systems Agency, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Program Management Office. Currently on a three-month stint for the General Services Administration

Title: Deputy Project Manager for the Defense Department's Public Key Enablement Team

Nominated for: Her hands-on assistance in developing, implementing and troubleshooting DOD's massive public key infrastructure and public key enabling initiatives. Scogin worked with DOD teams to identify possible gaps in customer requirements, was co-chairwoman of a cross-government working group on PKI best practices, researched technical topics for program leaders and helped to establish a PKE newsletter to keep stakeholders informed.

First IT mentor: My husband, Brian Holcomb, was and is my IT mentor. As a fellow IT professional, he has advised, taught, encouraged and been an excellent sounding board to me beginning with my first IT job at the Naval Research Laboratory. His simple advice of “computers only do what you tell them to do” has always been helpful.

Latest accomplishment on the job: As a member of the DOD Public Key Enablement Team, I have the opportunity to work with the U.S. military departments, services, agencies and combatant commands to secure their networks and information using PKI certificates. This promotes assured and secured information sharing so that the warfighters can trust the information they depend on to make critical decisions. Recently, I’ve had the opportunity to co-chair the Logical Access Working Group under the Identity, Credential and Access Management federal CIO subcommittee, where representatives from more than 23 federal agencies share lessons learned with PKI enablement and are working toward creating agencywide logical access control systems implementation guidance for the Federal ICAM Roadmap.

Career highlight: Supporting Combined Endeavor, the U.S. European Command’s command, control, communications and computers interoperability exercise between NATO and Partnership for Peace nations with PKI implementation and enablement.

Favorite job-related bookmark: Definitely the Internet Engineering Task Force and, more specifically, the pkix page. Nothing helps more than a thorough understanding of the Internet standards.

Favorite app: Kayak –- I love to travel.

Dream non-IT-related job: I'd love to one day go home to Mississippi and start a flower and vegetable nursery like my grandparents did when I was a little girl.

Read the next Rising Star profile or view the full list of winners.

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