FDA flips switch on performance management app

FDA-TRACK launched for public and staff to track success on benchmarks

The Food and Drug Administration is now publicly tracking dozens of agency performance measures on 40 online dashboards in its new FDA-TRACK initiative that went live Aug. 31.

The FDA-TRACK dashboards launched in beta format in April with more than 100 agency program offices reporting on individual and agencywide benchmarks, but many of the dashboards reported that incoming data was not yet available. To date, a significant portion of the FDA dashboards continue to indicate that specific information is not yet available for certain measures. However, data is starting to flow.


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For example, the FDA’s Freedom of Information Act dashboard posted that it received 1,116 information requests in June, a jump from 762 in May. Nearly a quarter of the June requests — 24 percent -- were assigned to the FDA Commissioner’s Office. On the FDA Office of Administration dashboard, building maintenance service tickets took an average of two days to resolve in March, down from 29 days in February. In addition, the FDA’s external affairs office said it increased subscriptions to e-mail newsletters to 227,480 in February, up by 3,041 from the previous month, the FDA said.

The performance measures will be established each year and data will be gathered monthly and posted on FDA-Track and presented each quarter to senior leadership, according to an Aug. 31 news release. The goal is to provide transparency for both the public and for FDA employees and managers, the release said.

“FDA-TRACK will bring the operations of this historically opaque Agency into the daylight and help us be even more responsive as we work to protect the public health,” FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said.

Two of the dashboards monitor agencywide measures, such as FOIA requests and the number of employees trained in incident command for emergencies.

 

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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