Army launches 'don't ask, don't tell' inbox

Inbox is accessible via the Army Knowledge Online homepage

The Army has started a “don’t ask, don’t tell” online inbox that will allow soldiers to share comments on the pending repeal of the law that bans openly homosexual men and lesbians from serving in the military.

The inbox is accessible via the Army Knowledge Online homepage, according to the Army News Service website. The intent of the inbox is to help the Army assess and consider whether repeal of the law would reduce operational readiness or unit cohesion.

The inbox will remain open until Sept. 30 or until Army leaders decide they have received enough comments. The comments are to be shared with the Defense Department Comprehensive Review Working Group, which is writing a report on the implications of possible repeal.

To safeguard identity of respondents, the posting said that Army will employ control measures, but it did not detail what those might be.

The inbox is part of a larger DOD effort to gauge troop opinion of repeal. This summer, officials e-mailed surveys to pre-selected servicemembers and their spouses to seek their opinions on the pending repeal. The surveys will also be delivered to the DOD review panel, whose final report is due to Defense Secretary Robert Gates by Dec. 1.

In May the full House and a key Senate panel voted for a bill to abolish the DOD ban.

 

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