California, Boston win awards for best government websites

Digital Government Achievement Awards recognize outstanding agency portals

The winners for best portal websites sponsored by state and local governments were California, the city of Boston and Chesterfield County, Va., in the 2010 “Best of the Web” competition sponsored by the Center for Digital Government research institute.

The center, which is affiliated with eRepublic Inc. media research company, presented 50 awards in several categories to websites sponsored by a government agency.

The Digital Government Achievement Awards recognize outstanding agency and department websites and projects at the application and infrastructure level.

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“The winners’ innovative use of the Internet to continue delivering services despite tight fiscal constraints is inspiring,” Cathilea Robinett, executive director of the center, said in a news release.

In the Best State Portal category, the top five leading websites belonged to California, Arkansas, Alabama, Maine and Kentucky. Michigan, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia also were finalists.

Among city portals, Boston was in first place, followed by Louisville, Ky.; Fort Collins and Castle Rock, both in Colorado; and Coralville, Iowa. Finalists included Chicago, Corpus Christi, Texas; Riverside, Calif.; Rochester, N.Y., and San Diego.

Following Chesterfield County, Va.,for best county portal Pinellas County, Fla.; Oakland County, Mich.; Maui County, Hawaii; and Park County, Colo.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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