Justice kills case management project; Interior tries plan B for data tool

Actions come after closer White House scrutiny of high-risk federal IT projects

As part of a White House ongoing performance review of 26 high-priority IT projects, the Justice Department has canceled a records management project and the Interior Department has restructured another, according to federal CIO Vivek Kundra.

Justice officials have killed the Litigation Case Management System, which was “years behind schedule and over budget,” saving $193 million, Kundra told the Federal CIO Council on Sept. 20. The Justice case management project, now in its fourth year, had doubled in cost over its original estimate. The system would have provided a common case management solution for divisions in the department.


Related stories:

White House takes whack at financial management money pits

White House targets 26 high-risk IT programs for fixes


In addition, the Interior Department has reorganized its Incident Management Analysis and Reporting System development program for a system to share security, law enforcement and emergency management information, Kundra said. By establishing incremental deliverables, Interior will accelerate delivery of services for its 6,000 law enforcement officers, he said.

The Office of Management and Budget started a review process for troubled financial management system projects in July and for 26 high-priority IT projects in August. In both programs, the IT projects are being reviewed by agency CIOs and OMB officials.

As part of that review, Kundra last week announced terminations and restructurings of financial management system development programs at four agencies.

 

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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