Internet doesn't replace traditional news outlets, survey finds

Pew survey finds online sources complementing more than replacing traditional outlets

The Internet and mobile technologies have been a big focus for agencies looking to get the word out on their programs, services, alerts and other news, but a recent survey suggests they shouldn’t give up on traditional channels just yet.

A survey taken in June by the Pew Research Center for People and the Press of 3,006 adults found that the average time people spent consuming news in a day rose from 67 minutes in 2006-2008 to 70 minutes this year, and they’re getting more of it online, although perhaps not as much more as you might think. The survey asked people how much time they had spent with news the previous day and which outlets they used.

Numerator inset

Click for larger image. Source: Pew Research Center for People and the Press

About the Author

Kevin McCaney is a former editor of Defense Systems and GCN.

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