FBI's new website has more than just the facts

Redesigned site offers easier navigation, new search engine, even 'Fun & Games'

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation recently unveiled its new website design -- a comprehensive overhaul of the site with easier navigation and a more news-orientated approach.

The new design is based in large part on visitor feedback, the agency said in announcing the change, and the FBI will continue to seek additional visitor feedback via pop-up surveys on the site.

Changes to the site include a simplified home page showcasing featured content and news; a new navigational format; a new A-Z index for locating information on the site; and a new search engine for gathering information on individuals on the agency’s Most Wanted list, including searches by name, sex, wanted category, crime category, rewards and locations.

The FBI has also added content and news in the “About Us” section; new pages on identity theft, intellectual property theft, health care fraud, and bank robbery issues; a new page about the agency’s partnerships and outreach efforts; a new “Intel-Driven FBI” page with details on the agency’s post-9/11 strategy as well as intelligence tools and capabilities; and new interactive features on its "History" page.

There also is a "Fun & Games" section with interactive quizzes, games and other information, including avatars of real FBI employees answering questions about their jobs.

Launched in 1995, www.fbi.gov has more than 30 million visitors annually.

About the Author

Kathleen Hickey is a freelance writer for GCN.

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