White House wants comments on nanotechnology plan

White House releases draft strategy for next three years

The White House is seeking comments on its plans for a $1.8 billion research and development program aimed at broadening the application of nanotechnology.

Nanotechnology works with matter at a very small scale, ranging from 1 to 100 nanometers, with a nanometer being one-billionth of a meter. Such technology is already in use in the areas of manufacturing, pharmaceuticals and electronics.

The National Nanotechnology Initiative would spur further development in a broad array of fields, including energy, health, national defense and intelligence, computation and measurement.

The draft strategic plan was put together by 25 agencies such as the White House Office of Science & Technology and the National Science and Technology Council, as well as scientific community leaders, who have been working on nanotechnology policy since 2001.


Related stories:

White House wants your ideas for National Nanotechnology Initiative
White House advisers soliciting ideas for 'golden triangle' technologies


Comments on the draft plan will be accepted until Nov. 30, according to a White House notice published Nov. 1.

The plan lays out these goals for nanotechnology research during the next three years:

  • Advancing world-class nanotechnology research and development.
  • Fostering the transfer of new technologies into products for commercial and public benefits.
  • Developing and sustaining education, a skilled workforce and other infrastructure to support advanced nanotechnology.
  • Supporting responsible development of nanotechnology, including risk assessment and mitigation.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.