Data.gov sets up open data communities page

Community members commenting on best practices, security issues

The White House’s Data.gov website has started an online Open Data Community page to encourage public discussions about accessing and sharing data.

The page, which began Nov. 15, has 10 categories of topics that include balancing security and openness; developing policies for global data sharing; and using geospatial data, semantic technologies and best practices.

Visitors to Data.gov are invited to register with the community to participate and comments are posted publicly.

The community's goal is to stimulate global innovation and transparency in government by working to access, share and curate data from government sources, according to statements on the site.


Related stories:

Data.gov adds GeoViewer feature to show data on maps

VA puts hospital data on data.gov


“This community bridges policy makers, technologists, data owners, and citizens -- each of us wants to get information to people who need to make decisions each day. As a member of this open data community, you can help to make this happen,” the site states.

The page also features a new blog by Sanjeev “Sonny” Bhagowalia, deputy associate administrator of the Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies at the General Services Administration.

The Obama administration introduced Data.gov in May 2009 to provide government data free in easily accessible formats. It has grown to offer 305,692 datasets and 236 new applications for the data.

Data.gov also recently published a 77-page concept of operations to guide its development. It outlines the site’s history, current architecture and offerings and describes future plans for semantic Web applications, mobile applications and geospatial data integrations.

One tool being considered for Data.gov is a “Data-Pedia” that would allow users to integrate local, state and national datasets into a mashup centralized in one location. Under consideration for Data.gov is a mashup of all geographic property ownership information that would integrate property maps from throughout the United States, the concept of operations states.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.