Telework bill becomes law

Agencies have 180 days to establish policies

President Barack Obama signed the Telework Enhancement Act into law today. It requires agencies to establish telework policies and seeks to expand the number of feds eligible to telework.

Agencies now have 180 days to establish policies, determine eligibility and notify all workers about their eligibility for telework.

In addition to setting new policies, agencies must appoint a telework managing officer, who must be a senior official with direct access to an agency head. The legislation also establishes interactive training programs for teleworkers and telework managers and includes telework in business continuity plans.

"Federal telework will make the government more efficient, more attractive to aspiring public servants, and more secure in the event of a natural disaster through continuity of operations,” the Telework Exchange said in a written statement.

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Alysha Sideman is the online content producer for Washington Technology.

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Reader comments

Mon, Dec 13, 2010 Beverly Maryland

First, the cost of servers that can be added to the server farm is minimal in comparison to the cost of 'housing' employees. The trade-off is cost effective. As to consistent connectivity, this may not be an issue of server capability but the end-user connectivity provider, and computing equipment in use. Another issue may be the operating system (OS) being used by teh end-user and its compatibility with the server OS. All aspects need to be addressed before it can be emphatically stated that the server is at fault.

Mon, Dec 13, 2010 Joe

Another unfunded mandate in a rash of them.

Fri, Dec 10, 2010 Nia Johnson Crowley Seattle

While I enjoy Teleworking immensely. I've become worried at the extra load on a server that is already getting bogged down with the number of employees accessing the site that enables us to Telework. Just yesterday the Citrex web site I log onto for Telework was increasingly getting bogged down. I was spending a significant portion of my time re-logging on, having to close out and re-log on due to freezing and slow processing. That is a very frustrating experience. and significantly limits my effectiveness.

Fri, Dec 10, 2010 MI

"expand the number of feds eligible to telework." And contractors?

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