Fed employee pay freeze becomes law

Legislation averts government shutdown

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was corrected to reflect that President Barack Obama signed the continuing resolution Dec. 22 and Congress approved the last-minute spending bill Dec. 21.

It's official: Federal employees will see a two-year salary freeze.

President Barack Obama signed a continuing resolution Dec. 22 to fund the government through March and freeze civilian federal employee pay for the next two years.

Both chambers of Congress approved the last-minute spending bill (H.R. 3082) Dec. 21.

Related coverage:

Could pay freeze send feds to private sector?

Pay freeze idea gets chilly reception

The resolution provides funding at a rate of approximately $1.16 billion over the fiscal 2010 level, according to a summary prepared by the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Labor groups have opposed the pay freeze, suggesting it unfairly targets federal workers and could affect retention.

The National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) President Colleen Kelley said the freeze “rings particularly hollow in light of the recent tax compromise between the administration and congressional Republicans that will give hundreds of billions of dollars to America’s wealthiest families.”

NTEU said it was also concerned that the resolution keeps most federal agency spending at current levels.

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Sat, Jun 30, 2012 surajit das Kolkata


Mon, Jan 24, 2011

I understand the need to reduce the deficit but why am I affected when the government doesnt pay my salary???

Tue, Jan 18, 2011

Congress is the only organization that I know of that provides a "pension" after 2 years of employment. Why? Why does Congress get have so many "benefits" other government workers do not get? They get paid more than most?

Thu, Jan 13, 2011

Since Federal Government employees are hit with a pay freeze for 2 years. There should be a rewrite of the rule for the high 3. Like myself I got a grade last year, by the time I work my high 3 which will count in my annuity. If I decide to stay for those 3 years my annunity will not be no more it will be based on what I am presently getting now. Congress should change that rule since they put a freeze on government pay for 2 yrs.

Tue, Jan 11, 2011

Why were federal employees burdened with this when it's congress that has not controlled spending across the board? It looks like they are "taxing" federal employees of their meager wage increases to fund the government. There are plenty of programs that should be cut, but attacking the federal employees first was a big mistake.

Show All Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group