Fed employee pay freeze becomes law

Legislation averts government shutdown

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was corrected to reflect that President Barack Obama signed the continuing resolution Dec. 22 and Congress approved the last-minute spending bill Dec. 21.

It's official: Federal employees will see a two-year salary freeze.

President Barack Obama signed a continuing resolution Dec. 22 to fund the government through March and freeze civilian federal employee pay for the next two years.

Both chambers of Congress approved the last-minute spending bill (H.R. 3082) Dec. 21.


Related coverage:

Could pay freeze send feds to private sector?

Pay freeze idea gets chilly reception


The resolution provides funding at a rate of approximately $1.16 billion over the fiscal 2010 level, according to a summary prepared by the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Labor groups have opposed the pay freeze, suggesting it unfairly targets federal workers and could affect retention.

The National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) President Colleen Kelley said the freeze “rings particularly hollow in light of the recent tax compromise between the administration and congressional Republicans that will give hundreds of billions of dollars to America’s wealthiest families.”

NTEU said it was also concerned that the resolution keeps most federal agency spending at current levels.

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Sat, Jun 30, 2012 surajit das Kolkata

Good

Mon, Jan 24, 2011

I understand the need to reduce the deficit but why am I affected when the government doesnt pay my salary???

Tue, Jan 18, 2011

Congress is the only organization that I know of that provides a "pension" after 2 years of employment. Why? Why does Congress get have so many "benefits" other government workers do not get? They get paid more than most?

Thu, Jan 13, 2011

Since Federal Government employees are hit with a pay freeze for 2 years. There should be a rewrite of the rule for the high 3. Like myself I got a grade last year, by the time I work my high 3 which will count in my annuity. If I decide to stay for those 3 years my annunity will not be no more it will be based on what I am presently getting now. Congress should change that rule since they put a freeze on government pay for 2 yrs.

Tue, Jan 11, 2011

Why were federal employees burdened with this when it's congress that has not controlled spending across the board? It looks like they are "taxing" federal employees of their meager wage increases to fund the government. There are plenty of programs that should be cut, but attacking the federal employees first was a big mistake.

Show All Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group