Dodaro is new comptroller general

Comptroller general appointed to a 15-year term

Gene Dodaro was sworn in Dec. 30 as the comptroller general of the United States and head of the Government Accountability Office. He has served as acting comptroller general since 2008.

“As comptroller general, I plan to build on GAO’s proud tradition as a steadfast, nonpartisan, professional watchdog for the American people; a trusted adviser for Congress; and a leading advocate for more efficient and effective management across government,” Dodaro said in a statement.


Related stories:

Senate committee approves Dodaro as GAO head

Dodaro picked to be comptroller


The comptroller general is appointed to a 15-year term. The Senate confirmed Dodaro’s nomination to the post on Dec. 22.

Dodaro has worked at GAO for 37 years. He has been chief operating officer and assistant comptroller general for GAO’s largest unit, the Accounting and Information Management Division.

“Looking ahead, the decisions facing policy-makers will, in many cases, be difficult ones crucial to our nation’s security and prosperity,” Dodaro said. “As in the past, GAO will be there to provide Congress with high-quality, objective and timely information.”

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

Featured

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    OPM nominee plans focus on telework, IT, retirement

    Kiran Ahuja, a veteran of the Office of Personnel Management, told lawmakers that she thinks that the lack of consistent leadership in the top position at OPM has taken a toll on the ability of the agency to complete longer term IT modernization projects.

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

Stay Connected