Dodaro is new comptroller general

Comptroller general appointed to a 15-year term

Gene Dodaro was sworn in Dec. 30 as the comptroller general of the United States and head of the Government Accountability Office. He has served as acting comptroller general since 2008.

“As comptroller general, I plan to build on GAO’s proud tradition as a steadfast, nonpartisan, professional watchdog for the American people; a trusted adviser for Congress; and a leading advocate for more efficient and effective management across government,” Dodaro said in a statement.


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Dodaro picked to be comptroller


The comptroller general is appointed to a 15-year term. The Senate confirmed Dodaro’s nomination to the post on Dec. 22.

Dodaro has worked at GAO for 37 years. He has been chief operating officer and assistant comptroller general for GAO’s largest unit, the Accounting and Information Management Division.

“Looking ahead, the decisions facing policy-makers will, in many cases, be difficult ones crucial to our nation’s security and prosperity,” Dodaro said. “As in the past, GAO will be there to provide Congress with high-quality, objective and timely information.”

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

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