OMB says post-WikiLeaks assessments due Jan. 28

New memo emphasizes security of automated systems

White House and national security officials have told federal agencies to complete their post-WikiLeaks initial assessments of how they handle classified national security information by Jan. 28. They also are calling for special attention to securing automated systems.

Following the WikiLeaks unauthorized disclosures of classified information two months ago, the White House on Nov. 28 ordered federal agencies to perform first assessments of how they are safeguarding classified national security information.

Office of Management and Budget Director Jacob Lew distributed a memorandum Jan. 3 indicating that the assessments are due Jan. 28.


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Lew enclosed a 13-page attached memorandum from Robert Bryant, national counterintelligence executive, and William Bosanko, director of the information security oversight office, both in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

They suggest that federal agency executives should pay special attention in the assessments to their efforts to secure automated systems.

“The initial Self Assessment items contained in this document pertain to security, counterintelligence, and information assurance disciplines, with emphasis on their application in automated systems,” Bryant and Bosanko wrote.

The assessments also are to cover management and oversight, counterintelligence, safeguarding, defense and detection of employee unauthorized disclosures, information assurance, education and training, personnel security, and physical and technical security, the memo states.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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