Energy Department launches redesigned site

New look highlights Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and Twitter links

The Energy Department today unveiled its partially redesigned website, Energy.gov, with highlights that include links to a department blog and to agency social networking sites.

The new home page is anchored by a photo of Secretary Steven Chu with an invitation to “follow” the secretary’s page on Facebook and to offer ideas on upcoming seminars. In four hours, Chu’s page on Facebook received 59 comments in response.

The partial redesign involved substantial changes in appearance and layout along with several new features, Cammie Croft, Energy's director of new media and citizen engagement, said today.


Related story:

A few bon mots on Facebook, Drupal with DOE's new media director


The next phase will involve transitioning the site's backbone to the Drupal open-source platform, which will be completed in several months, Croft said. The transition will not create major changes to the site's appearance, she said.

“We’re excited with this step forward and we know we have a lot more work to do,” Croft said. Energy.gov typically receives about 250,000 visits a week.

As part of the partial redesign, the site's Energy Blog absorbed more than 400 past entries from the EnergyEmpowers.gov site, which also had been run by the department and is no longer operating. Croft said the entries were moved to the Energy Blog to save costs and to leverage traffic from Energy.gov.

A new feature is "Vintage DOE," a series of articles, videos, photos and other media about historic aspects of the department.

In addition, the department is planning to host a series of live video Web chats with Chu on the new website, Croft said. Dates for the chats haven't been announced.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    human machine interface

    Your agency isn’t ready for AI

    To truly take advantage, government must retool both its data and its infrastructure.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network (bluebay/Shutterstock.com)

    Federal CISO floats potential for new supply chain regs

    The federal government's top IT security chief and canvassed industry for feedback on how to shape new rules of the road for federal acquisition and procurement.

  • People
    DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, shown here at her Nov. 8, 2017, confirmation hearing. DHS Photo by Jetta Disco

    DHS chief Nielsen resigns

    Kirstjen Nielsen, the first Homeland Security secretary with a background in cybersecurity, is being replaced on an acting basis by the Customs and Border Protection chief. Her last day is April 10.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.