NIH, CDC sign global pact on data sharing

17 agencies and groups agree to overcome barriers to sharing public health data

Five federal health research agencies are among the 17 government and private groups that have agreed to share research findings on public health in a more timely and effective manner.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration are among the organizations that signed the agreement.

The goal is to share population data in ways that are equitable, ethical and efficient, said Mark Walport, director of Wellcome Trust, and Paul Brest, president of the Hewlett Foundation, in announcing the agreement Jan. 10.


Related stories:

CDC expands flu-tracking efforts

Committee studies public health, research


In recent years, agencies and organizations that fund public health research around the world have recognized barriers to sharing information, including concerns about balancing the needs of researchers, analysts, communities and funders and protecting the privacy of people and communities.

The funding agencies have held several meetings to agree on core principles for sharing data.

A number of problems remain, including the need to build an infrastructure and culture to support data sharing, providing incentives for data sharing and providing tools to analyze, store, secure and preserve the data, Walport and Brest said in the release.

"The commitment of so many leading funding agencies sends a strong signal that we are committed to maximizing the full potential of public health research data to generate better health," Brest said.

Other signatories to the agreement include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the World Bank and agencies in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

The Fed 100

Read the profiles of all this year's winners.

Featured

  • Shutterstock image (by wk1003mike): cloud system fracture.

    Does the IRS have a cloud strategy?

    Congress and watchdog agencies have dinged the IRS for lacking an enterprise cloud strategy seven years after it became the official policy of the U.S. government.

  • Shutterstock image: illuminated connections between devices.

    Who won what in EIS

    The General Services Administration posted detailed data on how the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions contract might be divvied up.

  • Wikimedia Image: U.S. Cyber Command logo.

    Trump elevates CyberCom to combatant command status

    The White House announced a long-planned move to elevate Cyber Command to the status of a full combatant command.

  • Photo credit: John Roman Images / Shutterstock.com

    Verizon plans FirstNet rival

    Verizon says it will carve a dedicated network out of its extensive national 4G LTE network for first responders, in competition with FirstNet.

  • AI concept art

    Can AI tools replace feds?

    The Heritage Foundation is recommending that hundreds of thousands of federal jobs be replaced by automation as part of a larger government reorganization strategy.

  • DOD Common Access Cards

    DOD pushes toward CAC replacement

    Defense officials hope the Common Access Card's days are numbered as they continue to test new identity management solutions.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group