Is printed legislation soon to be extinct?

Bill would keep GPO from churning out hundreds of hard copies for each piece of legislation

The government’s printing presses may slow down in the near future.

The House passed the Stop the Over Printing Act (H.R. 292) on Jan. 18.

The bill would stop the presses from churning out hundreds of hard copies of each piece of legislation unless a member of Congress requests a copy. Instead, members woulds receive pages digitally via the Internet.


Related story:

New-look Federal Register online debuts


A House or Senate committee could ask for paper copies of legislation but could only ask for printed copies of bills or resolutions within its jurisdiction and could only get 75 copies of a bill.

"With technological advancements, we have become a paperless world," said Rep. Chris Lee (R-N.Y.). "It is a waste of taxpayer dollars to automatically print and send multiple unsolicited copies of something that is readily available online."

Supporters say the bill could save up to $7 million that the Government Printing Office is expected to spend on congressional printing this year.

The measure is now in the Senate.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

Featured

  • Defense
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) reveal concept renderings for the Next NGA West (N2W) campus from the design-build team McCarthy HITT winning proposal. The entirety of the campus is anticipated to be operational in 2025.

    How NGA is tackling interoperability challenges

    Mark Munsell, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s CTO, talks about talent shortages and how the agency is working to get more unclassified data.

  • Veterans Affairs
    Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer speaks at an Oct. 10 FCW event (Photo credit: Troy K. Schneider)

    VA's pivot to agile

    With 10 months on the job, Veterans Affairs CIO Jim Gfrerer is pushing his organization toward a culture of constant delivery.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.