Fed health IT leader submits resignation

Blumenthal to leave National Coordinator for Health IT position in the spring

Dr. David Blumenthal today announced his resignation as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at the Health and Human Services Department.

He plans to leave the office in the spring to return to Harvard University.

Blumenthal has been leading the federal strategy for electronic health records including the offering of nearly $20 billion in incentive payments to doctors' offices and hospitals that purchase and deploy medical record systems. Congress authorized the program under the economic stimulus law of 2009.

Blumenthal spearheaded the release of HHS regulations in 2009 and 2010 to oversee distribution of the funding to providers who meaningfully use the new health IT systems, including collecting clinical and public health data for exchange and research. He also led efforts to develop the Nationwide Health Information Network to share health data, as well as to create local and regional health exchange networks.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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