GOP leader ups the ante: $100 billion in spending cuts this fiscal year

Details on spending cuts will be available when bill is formally introduced

If House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-Ky.) gets his way, there'll be no need to wait for fiscal 2012 to start dealing with spending cuts. Rogers plans to cut $100 billion in spending in an upcoming continuing resolution bill that will cover the remainder of fiscal 2011.

Just the day before, Rogers had estimated that his CR legislation would cut spending by more than $74 billion. The current CR is set to expire at the beginning of March.


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Rogers said in a statement that he revised his earlier estimate after meeting with his subcommittee leaders. He also said the $100 billion spending reduction is in comparison to the president’s fiscal 2011 budget proposal and will fulfill the goal outlined in Republicans’ “Pledge to America” made last year. 

“Our intent is to make deep but manageable cuts in nearly every area of government, leaving no stone unturned and allowing no agency or program to be held sacred,” Rogers said. “I have instructed my committee to include these deeper cuts, and we are continuing to work to complete this critical legislation.”

The specific cuts proposed in the CR legislation will be available when Rogers formally introduces the bill, according to the committee.

About the Author

Alyah Khan is a staff writer covering IT policy.

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