New federal deputy CTO chosen

Former San Francisco CIO moves to Washington

Former San Francisco CIO Chris Vein was appointed this month as Deputy CTO for Government Innovation in the Executive Office of the President’s Science and Technology Policy Office, reports Fedscoop.com.

Vein, who graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with an MPA, was San Francisco’s CIO for six years. He worked in city government for 10 years. 


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Dreaming big, working hard and inspiring others, are what it takes to be innovative in government, Vein told Fedscoop in an interview posted on YouTube.

Having vision is another important aspect to getting things done, he said. “You can’t get caught up in all the minutiae and the problems…[there are] so many things in government to prevent you from doing something,” he told FedScoop.

Vein's specialties include “delivering strong and effective leadership often in chaotic environments” by using his skills in corporate governance, strategic and business planning, operations and finance and administration, Vein writes on his LinkedIn page.
 
Vein worked on San Francisco’s open source and government 2.0 initiatives.

 

About the Author

Alysha Sideman is the online content producer for Washington Technology.

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