Teri Takai leaves CIO job open

Wanted: Calif. CIO

The appointment of Teri Takai as the Defense Department’s CIO has left an attractive job opening in California -- the state's CIO.

According to the job announcement from California Technology Agency (formerly Office of the State CIO), the person who captures the position, which will remain open until filled, will be paid $175,000 plus benefits and will be a member of Gov. Jerry Brown’s cabinet, reports GovTech.com. When Takai left her post as California’s CIO in 2009 she was making $158,000.


Related articles:

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Defense CIO confirmation on ice for now

New DOD CIO lays out top priorities


Tekai served as CIO for California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. She began work at DOD last Nov. 7. Nominated to the post by President Barack Obama, her nomination was later withdrawn before her final confirmation, according to Federal Computer Week. Confirmation hearings were put on hold while Defense Secretary Robert Gates made good on his promise to slash the defense budget by reviewing the organization’s structure, writes FCW.

State CIO duties include directing technology strategy for California’s government agencies, departments and offices.

 

 

About the Author

Alysha Sideman is the online content producer for Washington Technology.

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