In shutdown, military would work without pay

Contingency plan spells out policies for shutdown

According to draft guidance circulating around the Defense Department, military personnel would be required to work without pay if the government shuts down, reports the Air Force Times.

That differs from the 1995 shutdown when U.S. troops reported to work and were paid, the article states. But the 13-page contingency plan, in which DOD highlighted which parts of the military would continue to operate if the government shuts down, states that this time the military would miss a payday if a shutdown continued through April 1.


Related story:

DOD contingency plan includes furloughs


The Federal Times writes that the memo was drafted shortly before Congress approved a two-week continuing resolution to fund the government through March 18.

Although many civilian DOD workers could be furloughed, U.S. troops would carry on in Afghanistan and would continue to prepare for deployment.

The military has faced budget shortfalls before, although there has not been a government shutdown since the Clinton administration. But as recently as 2008, DOD made plans when it looked like Congress might not approve supplemental war funding in time.

In that plan, reported Richard Walker in Federal Computer Week, officials also anticipated requiring military personnel to continue to serve without pay while furloughing non-essential civilian personnel.

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