House member says he can save feds' transparency websites

Budget trimming threatens sites that provide government information to the public

Open-government advocate Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, thinks feds won't have to pull the plug on websites such as Data.gov, USASpending.gov, the IT Dashboard and other federal programs that promote transparency, reports Federal News Radio.

Issa maintained that it is his “personal pledge” to keep the sites from shutting down in spite of an announcement this week of $27 million in cuts in the E-Government Fund.

“The specific funding goes away, but reprogramming authority would still be available," Issa told Federal News Radio. "Our view is on a case-by-case basis we will be able to keep them open."

John Wonderlich, writing in the Sunshine Foundation's blog, said Issa's promise is "huge".

One reason it's huge, Wonderlich writes, is because Issa is one of very few politicians -- and a highly ranking one -- to publicly support open-government programs during the budget fight.

"Issa doesn't just speak highly of the effort, though," Wonderlich adds, quoting Issa: ""We will find a way, and this is a personal pledge, to make sure they are not shut down."

The import of that: "On the eve of the budget deal vote, Chairman Issa is linking himself to the sites started by the electronic government fund that we've been fighting to sustain for weeks," Wonderlich writes.

 

 

 

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Reader comments

Mon, Apr 18, 2011 Bill

One day, the GOP and the public will finally understand that Federal service is DIFFERENT from the private sector. We have to put up with 'higher expectations' such as being fired if we are deliquent on taxes (probably awarded a ribbon in the private sector) as the latest proposal would have it. Also, we have security clearances to deal with, open hiring practices which slow us down and tie us up in red tape; ditto for procurement practices. And last, but not least, FOIA and open government requirements. So, when the GOP wants to cut the budget, they protect all these open government initiatives, but not those doing the work that needs to be open to the public. I guess I won't be alive when the GOP finally acknowledges the value of the federal worker. When I retire, I'll become a greedy private sector employee just like the GOP wants, supported by Wall Street.

Mon, Apr 18, 2011 Bill

One day, the GOP and the public will finally understand that Federal service is DIFFERENT from the private sector. We have to put up with 'higher expectations' such as being fired if we are deliquent on taxes (probably awarded a ribbon in the private sector) as the latest proposal would have it. Also, we have security clearances to deal with, open hiring practices which slow us down and tie us up in red tape; ditto for procurement practices. And last, but not least, FOIA and open government requirements. So, when the GOP wants to cut the budget, they protect all these open government initiatives, but not those doing the work that needs to be open to the public. I guess I won't be alive when the GOP finally acknowledges the value of the federal worker. When I retire, I'll become a greedy private sector employee just like the GOP wants, supported by Wall Street.

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